Film

Gran Torino


Gran Torino (2008)
★★★ / ★★★★

I honestly thought this movie was going to end up a dud because the previews looked really preachy. But after about fifteen minutes into the film, I really cared for Clint Eastwood’s character even though he’s racist and a very secretive person. I knew he would open up a bit after meeting his Hmong neighbors but I wanted to see his struggles before becoming a better person. Eastwood’s character made me laugh even though he uses every racist Asian term because we are made to understand what he’s been through and how conflicted he is by people who do not look like him. The way he interacted with the Hmongs during a party was done in a bona fide manner, such as when the older women kept putting food on his plate. As part of the Asian community, that rings true whenever there’s a special occasion, especially when others think that you’re too skinny. The film was at its best whenever Eastwood’s character would interact with Ahney Her and Bee Vang; we come to realize that he treats them like a daughter and son, respectively, more than his blood relatives, and they treat him more like a father or a grandfather more than anyone else. There was a point in the film when Eastwood admitted that he finds more similarities with his ethnic neighbors than with his own flesh and blood. I think a lot of people feel that way especially when they don’t feel like they are appreciated despite their flaws. In a way, Eastwood’s character reminded me of my late grandfather. Even though my grandfather was not strict, he resembled Eastwood’s mannerisms such as his intimidating growl and the way he walked. As much as I loved the comedic moments, the dramatic elements are also very involving. The scenes which feature the Hmong gangs and the things they are capable of are both scary and heartbreaking. (I’m amazed by some people on IMDB who claim that Asian gangs don’t exist. Yes, they do exist.) I thought the ending was perfectly handled because it shows how much Eastwood’s character has grown and what he is willing to do for the kids who taught him how to feel more alive and connected. In the end, we realize what the Gran Torino is supposed to symbolize. Directed and produced by Clint Eastwood, “Gran Torino” is rumored to be his last film. If it is, I think his fans will (or should be) proud of this film. If it isn’t, then I’m excited for what he will come up with in the future.

3 replies »

  1. This movie was a horrible dogpile of stereotypes and hidden racism that only flatters viewers and reinforces an insanely superficial cultural myth of American idealism. In the past, I’ve liked Clint’s movies, but this one was vile from so many different angles, I seriously urge others not to see it. Not “boycott”–just do not see this movie. Even from a moderate standpoint it is a pointless piece of junk with a meaningless, self-destructive conclusion. Save your money.

  2. Jesse, yes, there may have been stereotypes about both the Asian and American cultures. However, I believe it was able to rise above those stereotypes and deliver a powerful message about one’s ability to change if one is open to it.

    As for the “meaningless, self-destructive conclusion” comment, I totally disagree. His decision was an expression of how far he is willing to go for those people who have embraced his imperfections, some of which his own flesh and blood can’t look past through.

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