Film

Bear Cub


Bear Cub (2004)
★★★★ / ★★★★

I didn’t expect to love this movie because of its coy title and familiar plot summary but the way it told the story with such intelligence and emotion is impressive. This Spanish gay-themed but not gay-centered film, written and directed by Miguel Albaladejo, focuses on José Luis García Pérez and the way he takes care of his nephew (David Castillo) when his mother decides to go to India. Each of the character is memorable because they are full of surprises. For instance, I couldn’t help but laugh and have a smile on my face afterwards when the hippie mother revealed that she thinks her son is gay and it’s wonderful/a gift. She has a certain energy and spunk which made me think of my own mother. Pérez may be gay and lives an openly gay lifestyle but that’s not even half of who he really is. He’s a great father-figure but he just doesn’t know it because he’s too preoccupied asking himself what would be best for his nephew. As for Castillo, he was actually given a character to portray, a character that helps to drive the story forward. As the film went on and we get to meet other characters such as the grandmother (Empar Ferrer), the story gets that much more interesting and serious. Toward the end of the film, some revelations occured and I couldn’t help but gasp because I didn’t see such twists coming. This gem of a Spanish film knows how to tell a simple but extremely layered story with colorful characters that doesn’t result to stereotypes. It manages to use its characters in such a way that if a particular character didn’t exist, the story would be that much weaker. I can only wish more American films are like this because it puts the characters’ motivations on the foreground and doesn’t judge their background. It really does make a difference when it comes to overall feel of the picture. Definitely check this one out if one is remotely interested.

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