Film

Maria Full of Grace


Maria Full of Grace (2004)
★★★ / ★★★★

Written and directed by Joshua Marston, “Maria Full of Grace” tells the story of a drug mule (Catalina Sandino Moreno) who ventures into the United States because she wants to provide a better life for herself, the baby she’s carrying and her family in Colombia. I love that this film did not glamorize the drug underworld: it’s presented as scary, dangerous and extremely unpredictable. The director was astute enough to establish Moreno’s plight back in Colombia. She’s a genuinely good person who works hard to earn money so that she can help her family out. When she realizes that she’s pregnant, she has to quickly figure out a way to provide for her future child but at the same time support her family because no one else will. We get to understand the disparate factors that ultimately drive her to lend her body to deliver drugs in America. There were a lot of scenes that were really hard for me to watch. When the filmmakers decided to show the lead character trying to swallow those drug pellets, I flinched multiple times not just because of the image on the screen but also the realization that such images really do happen in real life. The plane scene is also a stand-out when one the girls is trying to convince herself that she’s okay despite the drugs being in her system. This film expertly shows people being in difficult situations and what they’re willing to do they get out of it. But this movie isn’t just about drug mules. There’s a brilliant scene with a fellow immigrant who talks to Moreno about the pride that comes after receiving her first paycheck in America. Even though I’ve never gone through that, I still could relate because my father went through the same thing: he went to America to support me, my mom and brother back when we were still in the Philippines. Although this film had a small budget, I thought it worked to its advantage; this vehicle was driven by powerful ideas that doesn’t stray from reality. That alone is enough to see this picture because most American mainstream films about drugs are sugarcoated.

3 replies »

  1. I remeber being impressed with this film when it premiered some three years ago, but while I have no reason to doubt its qualities, it still lacked something distinctively ‘cinematical’ to make it stick with me over time. As it stands now, it has pretty much faded from memory, one of a long line of obviously ‘important’ that lacked the final touch to be completely enduring.

  2. Really? You even have no recall of those scenes where she had to swallow the drugs? I think I would remember that three years from now more than anything about this picture. You should’ve seen me–I had this completely horrified/omg-I-cannot-believe-it look on my face as she struggled to do it. You would’ve laughed at me. lol

  3. Sure, I remember the genuine unpleasantness of those scenes, but I still think the film as a whole lacked some undefinable quality necessary it beyond a ‘liberal guilt’ movie.

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