Skip to content

August 21, 2009

Confessions of a Shopaholic

by Franz Patrick


Confessions of a Shopaholic (2009)
★★★ / ★★★★

You know, I’ve got to say that twenty minutes into this movie, I thought it was going to be just another shallow chick flick about a woman, played by Isla Fisher (“Definitely, Maybe,” “The Lookout,” “Wedding Crashers”), who liked to shop for expensive clothes and eventually fell in love with a guy who speaks with a European accent, played by the very charming Hugh Dancy (“Beyond the Gates,” “Ella Enchanted”). Yes, that was the basic premise. But then the last forty minutes of the picture arrived and it convinced me that it wanted to be something more. And it succeeded on multiple levels. When all of the main character’s lies and credit card bills finally caught up with her, there was an inherent sadness about her whole predicament. I was convinced that she genuinely did want to change, but like an addict, she kept going back to her old ways despite the advice from her family and friends. I’ve read some critiques that the tone of this film was uneven. Strangely enough, that’s what I liked about it. The first part was more comical and blasé because it intended to establish a character who was very energetic and had a real passion for fashion. The second part was more about her insecurities, conflict with her inner demons (and bill collector played hilariously by Robert Stanton–that elevator scene was absolutely brilliant), crumbling relationships with the people who are most important to her, and the things that she had to do (no matter how much it pained her) to stop drowning in debt. Directed by P.J. Morgan (2003’s “Peter Pan” and “My Best Friend’s Wedding”–another film that was surprisingly effective), “Confessions of a Shopaholic” has a little bit of edge just below that pink, glittery surface. I also liked the fact that the romance between Fisher and Dancy was always secondary. Their scenes were a nice break from the money issues and I could not help but laugh during their dancing scene. Though they did have some chemistry, I’m glad that Harvey chose to focus more on the lead’s addiction. I also very much enjoyed the supporting characters such as Krysten Ritter, Joan Cusack and John Goodman as Fisher’s best friend, mother and father, respectively. If the film had less slapstick and a stronger core, this probably would have had a pretty powerful punch considering that most Americans are now wary of the things they buy due to the failing economy.

Advertisements

Feel free to leave a comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: