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November 16, 2009

5

Unforgiven

by Franz Patrick


Unforgiven (1992)
★★★★ / ★★★★

I’ve always wondered about this classic western about three men (Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Jaimz Woolvett) who decided to hunt down two other men who cut up a woman’s face (Anna Levine) for the price of $1000, but I was always reluctant to see it because the western genre is my least favorite. I’m glad to have finally given it the chance it more than deserved because it absolutely blew me away. Every scene felt like a crucial piece of the puzzle in order to understand why certain things were happening and why certain things must happen. I truly identified with Eastwood as a man who used to be a drunk and a killer because every fiber of his being was fighting his inner demons regarding the people he killed for no good reason. In every frame, I felt the fierce passion in his eyes, the wounded soul in his voice and the subtleties of his body movements; it made me believe that he really was a changed man. But eventually, it was nice to see why he did not want to be that kind of person anymore, not just because he now had a family, saw the error of his ways, and wanted to set a good example, but because that person really was engulfed in such darkness whose sole motivation was to kill. All of the supporting actors were exemplary such as the villanous authority of the town played by Gene Hackman, the leader of the prostitutes played by Frances Fisher, and the kid who was so enthusiastic about killling even though he had myopia (Woolvett). Although this was a western film, I was surprised because it was very anti-violence. Even though there were shooting involved, a requisite in most western pictures, the thesis of having no honor in killing was always at the forefront. I never thought I would ever be interested in watching more western films, but after seeing “Unforgiven,” perhaps I just might. This film will definitely set the standard of my eventual foray into westerns. I can honestly say that this deserved its Best Picture and Best Director win at the Oscars because despite the film looking a bit dated, the emotions are still raw and quite timeless. Complexity within its deceitful simplicity is this film’s forté and it succeeds in every single way. That’s a rarity.

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5 Comments Post a comment
  1. Nov 16 2009

    this is a classic movie… somehow doesnt feel like its an old movie… still so refreshing after so many years

    Reply
  2. Nov 25 2009

    Top western flick. Despite Hollywood and its Oscars and all that. It’s one of the best effin’ westerns and study on decency ever. Nice one.

    Reply
  3. unity768
    Nov 28 2009

    Nice review of one my favorite westerns..maybe even my absolute favorite. Thanks for adding me to your site I appreciate it.

    Reply
    • Nov 30 2009

      Tommy: It’s my pleasure. Your reviews are so thorough and insightful. I wish I can write reviews like yours more often instead of only glossing over each movie I watch. I’ll drop by once in a while. :)

      Reply
  4. Nov 30 2009

    I’m glad you guys enjoyed it, too. I was very reluctant to see it only because I really cannot stand westerns. Good thing I listened to a friend.

    Reply

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