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September 18, 2011

Rest Stop

by Franz Patrick


Rest Stop (2006)
★ / ★★★★

Nicole (Jaimie Alexander) and Jesse (Joey Mendicino) decided to run away together. Jesse, an aspiring actor, invited his girlfriend to live with him in Los Angeles after he snagged a role. Nicole, who lived in Texas her entire life and depended on her parents for everything, was swayed by the romantic notion and accepted. When they finally reached California, Nicole needed to use the restroom so the couple visited an isolated rest stop. When Nicole exited the restroom, she noticed her boyfriend and their car was no longer there. Written and directed by John Shiban, “Rest Stop” was devoid of inspiration. It shamelessly adopted elements from every horror picture in which a female was stalked by a madman. However, that was not my main problem with it. I was more bothered by the fact that the material embodied an inconsistent and extremely frustrating rising action. When Nicole was terrorized, just when I thought it was over for our protagonist, the man in the baseball hat would suddenly stop. I understood that he relished her terror and it was all a game for him. But there’s a way to helm a project without making the breaks between the high-pitched screams feel stale. I would have been more invested in the story if Nicole had been smarter. Just because she was sheltered, she didn’t have to be stupid. The limitation of the writing was evident. For instance, the rest stop was surrounded by trees. I didn’t understand why Nicole, after breaking into a room with a radio, decided to drink the alcohol she found in a drawer. Maybe she thought she was safe after one person received her transmission, but a smart heroine, the kind we could root for despite her blunders, would have attempted to talk to at least three different people to ensure that the other person on the other line was not the killer. Instead, what she decided to do was disheartening: she chugged the alcohol and simply waited for help–outside where she was exposed, where she knew the killer could be watching. Furthermore, as she tried to leave the area by hiding behind the trees, every time she saw the yellow truck approaching, she was foolish enough to jump onto the main road and run from there. No wonder she couldn’t escape. It’s like playing hide and seek and you decide to change hiding places in front of the person who was looking around. But the most critical misstep involved the invocation of the supernatural. Although there are exceptions, the supernatural was unnecessary in this slasher flick because it became less believable. The horror relied on the concept of us inevitably stopping at a rest area when we go on long drives. A ghost was too much of a leap, almost a distraction, from what could been a realistic, genuinely terrifying predicament.

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