Skip to content

November 20, 2011

Swimming Pool

by Franz Patrick


Swimming Pool (2003)
★★★ / ★★★★

Sarah Morton (Charlotte Rampling), a British author of a highly successful detective series, decided to take up her publisher’s (Charles Dance) offer visit his home in France for some peace and relaxation. Maybe she could even write a book if inspiration came knocking. Sarah expressed that she was unhappy about her work as of late and wanted to do something different. When Julie (Ludivine Sagnier), the publisher’s daughter, also visited the house, she just might be the inspiration Sarah needed to revitalize her passion for writing. Directed by François Ozon, “Swimming Pool” was widely criticized for having a slow burn of a start only to pick up its pace when the story reached its murder mystery. I couldn’t disagree more. What I loved about the film was its ability to make the mundane absolutely fascinating. When Sarah arrived in the isolated French house, the silence was deafening as she strolled around its humble magnificence. We could only hear her footsteps, the rustling of the sheets as she unpacked, and the furniture being dragged across the floor. It was as if the house was slowly being awakened from its deep slumber. With Sarah staring across the balcony, I could feel her thinking. I felt her worrying about her work and her strained relationship with her publisher. She was a confident woman but perhaps she was beginning to doubt herself. When she stepped outside of the house to go shopping or have some wine, there was joy in that as well because Rampling had such expressive eyes. She didn’t have to say a word yet I was able to extract so much emotion from her character. Like a very good book, the story unfolded effortlessly and I was curious what would happen next. On the other hand, Julie was the requisite spice to stir up Sarah’s ennui. Julie was sexy, had a proclivity for danger, and was very sexually active. Sarah was inspired by Julie, sometimes bordering on obsession, and perhaps there was a bit of jealousy there because our protagonist was aging. The beauty of the picture was not every emotion and every glance was explained so it was up to us to translate the images we were seeing. And like the best mystery novels, it assumed that we were intelligent, proactive, and mature audiences. It didn’t shy away from nudity and sexuality which were important components because it has been said that we are most physiologically alive when sex enters the picture. Sarah’s inspiration slowly came to life. The murder mystery was simply an icing on the cake. It provided an extra dimension because Sarah was able to make a career from writing murder mysteries. Ultimately, “Swimming Pool” was a story about an author and her muse. It had a beautiful cinematography, wonderful script, and subjects that were simply firecrackers.

Advertisements

Feel free to leave a comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: