Film

Batman & Robin


Batman & Robin (1997)
★ / ★★★★

Dr. Pamela Isley (Uma Thurman), a horticulturalist stationed in South America whose project involved cross-breeding animal and plants, caught Dr. Woodrue (John Glover) creating a super soldier named Bane (Jeep Swenson) for bidding. When she expressed her disapproval of her colleague’s indiscretions, Dr. Woodrue tried to kill her by pushing her into a batch of chemicals. This altered Dr. Isley’s DNA and gave her, now Poison Ivy, the ability to manipulate plants. Pairing up with Bane, the duo headed to Gotham City to demand answers from Bruce Wayne (George Clooney) for cutting funds out of their project. Written by Akiva Goldsman and directed by Joel Schumacher, “Batman & Robin” suffocated from too many plots which was unfortunate because there was a hint of good material lost in a jungle of bad. The strand which involved the decline of Alfred Pennyworth’s (Michael Gough) health was interesting because prior to this point, he had nothing much to do except being a butler to Bruce and offering a wise commentary when Bruce struggled for answers in terms of the dichotomy between his personal and professional life. Even though Alfred was only the help of the Wayne manor, it was tough to see him looking frail and lackadaisical because he was our protagonist’s only father figure. Unfortunately, the film put more weight in having fun in the form racing motorbikes which was aimed to symbolize teenage rebellion, Poison Ivy winking at the camera and mentioning how her action figures always came with Bane, and Bruce appearing in social functions with a woman (Elle Macpherson) we knew absolutely nothing about but marriage was apparently on the horizon. This confusing, cheesy pot of doldrum was heated to a boil so slowly and so painfully, it threatened the integrity of the project and the franchise. Furthermore, while I believed Clooney as Bruce the multibillionaire with that winning smile, I had an incredibly difficult time believing him as Batman. The ultimate challenge that Clooney had to face did not occur during the action scenes when he had to throw a punch and utter laughably trite lines of dialogue. It was in the silent moments when Clooney, dressed as Batman, stood next to Robin (Chris O’Donnell). I knew there was a big problem when I found that my eyes gravitated toward O’Donnell more often even if he wasn’t saying anything. Unlike Clooney, O’Donnell was a good choice to play Robin because he could just scoff and I knew exactly what his character was thinking. This error in casting proved very distracting. Notice that Clooney continued to sport a little smile when discussing Alfred’s affliction. That smile made me very angry because it communicated apathy. The scene should have had an air of seriousness because, after all, Alfred raised Bruce like a son. I wondered if the director even reshot the scene. From the looks of it, more attention was put into the special and visual effects of the chases and explosions which were, admittedly, admirable for their colors and detail. Meanwhile, Mr. Freeze (Arnold Schwarzenegger), eventually teaming up with Poison Ivy and Bane, was reduced to delivering puns, referring to himself as a “villain” and Batman and Robin as “heroes.” Well-established antagonists with real goals don’t consider themselves as villains; they don’t feel guilt toward what they do because they believe what they’re doing is right. Knowing a bit about the deeper and touching details of why Mr. Freeze turned to a life of crime, which involved his wife in cryogenic sleep, it made me angry that the picture mostly portrayed him as a cold-blooded automaton. Wouldn’t it have been more interesting if, despite his intimidating appearance, he was actually portrayed as having a heart, someone who didn’t enjoy hurting people, but he felt he needed to in order to get one step closer in saving his love? The action sequences in “Batman & Robin,” one occurred in the Gotham City Museum of Modern Art looking like an ice rink on acid, were quite a sight at times but it had no heart. It wasn’t cool to give the audience such a cold shoulder.

5 replies »

    • Hands down!! I can’t get over how bad this was. I watched “Batman: The Animated Series” when I was a kid. Poison Ivy and Mr. Freeze were some of my favorite villains. They were treated like they were nothing here. Boooo.

      • Exactly!!! I’m still a big fan of Batman: TAS, and even the most lesser of those episodes was ten times better than Batman and Robin. Worse, this movie did a terrible injustice to Mr. Freeze, who next to Two Face, may be the most sympathetic of the Batman villains. His story really needs a detailed telling. The sight of Arnold in fuzzy slippers just makes me shudder!!!

        • You’re absolutely right that Mr. Freeze’s background story needed a detailed telling. It’s the only way to make him sympathetic or at least for us to understand why he is driven to do the things he does.

          Hahah! The fuzzy slippers! I guess I put that image in the dumpster of my brain.

          I guess the writers and director opted for a comical approach. They did not adapt to the natures of the villains. This is unwise because more often than not, villains tend to define a superhero film–any movie, actually, that requires us to root for someone and against.

          • Exactly, Franz Patrick. I can’t feel anything for comic book portrayals of tragic characters — it robs them of their humanity. And that’s why I felt nothing for Arnold’s Mr. Freeze and Tommy Lee’s Jones’ Two-Face. On the other hand, I felt a great deal of empathy and sympathy for Aaron Eckart’s Two-Face in The Dark Knight. I liked him as person before he became the monster. I felt sorry for him, trapped in his prison of pain.

            Sorry about the fuzzy slippers reference. I know … so very painful!

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