Skip to content

June 1, 2014

1

Thor: The Dark World

by Franz Patrick


Thor: The Dark World (2013)
★★ / ★★★★

Every five thousand years, the nine realms, including that of Earth and Asgard, align which means that gravity, light, and matter are able to penetrate through worlds. When Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) stumbles upon a fluid-like weapon called Aether, a Dark Elf named Malekith (Christopher Eccleston), defeated by the ancestors of Odin (Anthony Hopkins), is awakened from his slumber. Driven by revenge for the deaths of his fellowmen, Malekith hopes to take advantage of the convergence by acquiring the Aether and bring about the eradication of the universe.

A total mood-killer for me when it comes to superhero movies is when a villain’s endgame fails to make sense in any way, shape, or form. “Thor: The Dark World,” based on the screenplay by Christopher Yost, Christopher Markus, and Stephen McFeely, belongs in this category. If Malekith were to succeed in ending the universe, while he would indeed get his revenge, how would this benefit him and his dwindling species in the long run? Would more resources be available for them? Could they live “outside” the universe given that the universe would be no longer? And yet despite these questions, a lack of practicality—on the level of a superhero picture anyway—is the least of its problems.

One of the driving forces of the film is the romance between Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and Jane. Their relationship is most unbelievable and near impossible to sit through because they are so boring together. A few jokes are attempted—she from Earth and he from a different world altogether—but not any of them are funny, memorable, or clever enough to pass as even remotely cute or entertaining.

Portman is a very good actress and it saddens me that she is given absolutely nothing substantial to do or say. The role could have been played by anyone who can look wide-eyed when physics-defying phenomena are discovered, act cute when a good-looking man is around, and look peeved when she comes across someone she does not particularly like.

I found the character to be insulting especially because Jane is supposed to be a brilliant scientist. With the way the character is written, I was not convinced that she is smart—someone who is an astrophysicist with three degrees. I felt Portman almost having to dumb herself down to play Jane. Why didn’t the writers challenge themselves to create a convincing, strong, and genuinely clever woman? I would rather watch an intellectual falling in love with Thor who, according to Loki (Tom Hiddleston, clearly the best performer in the film), is a “witless oaf.” I agree somewhat.

What makes Thor a great superhero? The film does not answer this question. For me, all I saw was a hunk of muscle in armor hammering his way through structures and bad guys. Although the movie offers some beautiful computerized action sequences as well as special and visual effects, there is little to no substance. We do not grow to like Thor any more or less—he is just there to look good, talk in a deep voice, and save the universe because the plot requires it.

Directed by Alan Taylor, “Thor: The Dark World” is likely to please those who like action. But those who like action with a little bit of brain, substance, real drama, and complex emotions are highly likely to be gravely disappointed. It is clear that Marvel is capable of excellence—or at least come close to it. Joss Whedon’s “The Avengers” and Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” are good examples. The ante has been increased. Thus, it is only appropriate that we expect more.

Advertisements
1 Comment Post a comment
  1. Jun 2 2014

    Good review Franz. I had fun with this. Not nearly as much as I did with the first, but what I was so surprised with here was how they were still capable of keeping these characters fun and interesting.

    Reply

Feel free to leave a comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

%d bloggers like this: