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August 15, 2015

Ant-Man

by Franz Patrick


Ant-Man (2015)
★★★ / ★★★★

Recently released from prison and unable to provide child support for his daughter (Abby Ryder Forston), desperate Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) results to yet another burglary. This time is different, however, because the safe he breaks into does not shelter money or jewels. Instead, inside is a suit that has the ability turn its wearer to the size of an ant.

Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) has invented this game-changing technology and he believes that Scott is the best candidate to break into a biotechnology company, locate the Yellowjacket—another suit that allows the wearer to turn minuscule—and destroy its data. The mission is of particular importance because Darren Cross (Corey Stoll), the company’s owner and Dr. Pym’s former protégé, hopes to sell this technology which would inevitably be used for warfare.

Although it does not stack up against the best of Marvel’s movies, “Ant-Man,” directed by Peyton Reed, is entertaining, funny, and creative nonetheless. Rudd is a daring casting choice for the superhero but it is a risk that works because the actor possesses a magnetic, effortless light. It is critical that we are drawn to the central character when he is not wearing the incredible suit because one can observe that the screenplay places more emphasis on human drama and relationships than the action—which sets it apart from the other Marvel offerings. Due to this difference, it is another reason why the film, despite its limitations, is worth seeing.

Once the world of the minuscule is introduced, the picture reaches a high level of excitement. We wonder how it is going to surprise us—and it is able to with just about every opportunity where Scott turns into Ant-Man. There is a wonderful sense of detail, from the molds growing in the bathtub to the fibers of a rug. At one point I wondered how it must be like to actually be that small. It is important that the CGI does not get in the way of the experience.

Furthermore, I enjoyed that when the suit worn, it does not always involve fighting an enemy or stealing an item. On the contrary, there are plenty of practice sessions which gives way for happy accidents and big laughs. Because Scott, without or without the suit, is flawed and vulnerable, it makes him more likable and interesting than the likes of other Marvel heroes like the sinewy but rather dull Thor.

We get plenty of opportunities to understand the motivations of the villain. Cross is not a complex character, but Stoll plays him with a cool menace. The performer is able to communicate that his character’s obsession to surpass his former mentor is only a half-step away from madness. This makes him curious but also dangerous. It is more entertaining than watching a villain who is so disconnected from reality from the get-go that he comes off too silly or cartoonish over the story’s arc.

“Ant-Man” functions on a smaller scale, in more ways than one, but the presentation is fresh, the performances are charming and energetic, and the action inspires a child-like sense of wonder, at best shown during a final battle involving a train set. It is a reminder that Marvel movies should not only be action-packed but also fun and escapist.

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