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August 26, 2015

1

Slow West

by Franz Patrick


Slow West (2015)
★★★ / ★★★★

Sixteen-year-old Jay Cavendish (Kodi Smit-McPhee) travels from Scotland to America so he could be with his one true love, unaware that there is a bounty of two thousand dollars for the heads of Rose (Caren Pistorius) and her father. Silas (Michael Fassbender) offers to aid Jay to reach his destination for a fee of one hundred dollars. Soon, however, a group of bounty hunters have figured out that all they have to do is follow the the boy and his guide and the reward will soon be theirs.

“Slow West,” written and directed by John Maclean, is a western with quirks and so although the pacing deliberately moves at snail’s pace, there are numerous small moments that are quite amusing and entertaining. The western genre is not my cup of tea but this one surprised me on almost all levels, from the pleasing performances to how the story unfolds. The writer-director has a knack for showing beautiful images.

One of the surprises involves the colors having the opportunity to stand out. Because Jay and Silas are constantly on the move, the environment always changes. We notice the hue, texture, and dryness of the desert background, how the water is blown by the wind during a flashback, and how the temperature of the temporary shade of interior structures must be like relative to being outside under the blazing watch of the sun. This is the kind of movie I can watch without sound and it is likely that I will still enjoy it.

I had doubts about the casting of Smit-McPhee. His look is so distinct—some may even claim bizarre because some of his facial features are so large relative to his bone structure—and I have not seen him do anything particularly outstanding. I was glad that these doubts were quickly dispelled. His character is quiet, polished, and thoughtful. I enjoyed Jay’s quiet musings and the way he looks up into the night sky and the stars. This young man is a dreamer and it made me wonder if people like him had a place in the American frontier where a person’s life is determined by a gun pointing at him.

The action sequences are nothing special but they do command a level of tension. The showdown at the very end is the loudest and the most complicated to execute, but the one that I will remember most is the scene in a shop where a couple busts in, pulls out a gun, and demands the owner to hand over the money. The scene resonates because the violence is used to remind the audience that there is a consequence to every death even though we may not remember a person’s name or face right after he or she hits the ground. A sense of melancholy creeps in when we least expect it.

I wished that “Slow West” had been more poetic because that is its strength. There are musings about love, death, and living—with a sense of irony tying them together—but none of these are explored thoroughly or enough to make a lasting impact. Also, I wanted to get a stronger sense of Jay and Silas’ relationship. What they share only becomes really interesting toward the latter third. At one point I imagined how the picture would have been different if Terrence Malick had a hand in co-directing.

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1 Comment Post a comment
  1. Aug 26 2015

    Then it would have been slower in pace (Terrence Malick). Nice review though, I saw it posted on Itunes yesterday and wondered if it was truly any good.

    Reply

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