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May 18, 2016

Murder Party

by Franz Patrick


Murder Party (2007)
★★ / ★★★★

“Murder Party,” written and directed by Jeremy Saulnier, is a charming horror-comedy that might have benefited greatly if it had a more sinister undercurrent about artists and their art. Instead, what results is a somewhat watchable, playful romp but one lacking intrigue.

On his way from the video store before Trick-or-Treating begins, Christopher (Chris Sharp) crosses paths with a piece of paper being blown by the wind. Written on it is a so-called event called Murder Party, an address, and an instruction to come alone. Under the impression that it is some sort of a fun Halloween party, Christopher makes a last-minute costume made of boxes, bakes a pumpkin cake with raisins as contribution, and takes off to attend the event. The address written on the invitation takes him to a secluded warehouse where five people wearing costumes—three men and two women—await their victim.

Most of the attempts at comedy come in the form of slapstick. The deaths are often silly and surprising, almost always in consecutive order, and so the gasps of horror are consistently followed by chuckles or laughter. The writer-director has a talent for shaping scenes that involve accidental deaths. Notice that with scenes that lead up to a death, they are often very busy: characters are talking at once, there are many body movements in the foreground or background, the editing employs quick number of cuts. Once such a strategy is recognized, one can anticipate that within the next minute or so, a character will drop dead.

In a way, however, ironically, this makes for a rather predictable viewing. Still, one might argue that the film is not about who dies but how one dies. There are some creativity during the death scenes and I enjoyed that there is an overall joy to the process—whether it be a performer trying his or her best to capture a specific emotion before signing out or how the special effects involving gore tend to evince a level of camp. Neither the performances nor the effects are always convincing or on point but there is an undeniable sense of fun.

The picture falls short when the subject of art is brought up. Each of the five potential killers is a sort of artist one way or another but we never get a clear picture of what each person wishes to accomplish with his or her art, their endgame, especially when he or she results to extreme ways to make a statement. The most we learn is the type of medium he or she specializes in and that they are vying for a grant.

It would have been a refreshing move if we knew more about the aspiring murders’ respective motivations more than the protagonist’s—especially when the protagonist is so passive and plain as Christopher is in the film. To have made the antagonists more interesting would have been a pretty big statement in itself.

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