Film

FirstBorn


FirstBorn (2016)
★ / ★★★★

“FirstBorn,” based on the screenplay by Sean Hogan and Nirpal Bhogal, lacks the depth necessary to create a horror picture with a fascinating mythos involving a little girl born with a special ability. Instead, it concerns itself with the usual, expected, exhausted tricks in the book. For instance, there are far too many occasions in which it attempts to make the viewers jump by belting out sudden, loud noises. It is a horror film that feels saddled by movies that came before instead of one that dares to forge its own path.

Most fascinating about the story, about halfway through, is when the little girl named Thea (Thea Petrie) is sent to an occultist (Eileen Davies) so that she can be trained to manage her gift of seeing those from the world of evil. These scenes provide an eerie feeling because there is something about Davis’ interpretation of her character that one feels shouldn’t be trusted. And yet later scenes show that the training does help Thea in putting the monsters at bay, protecting her parents from being attacked by invisible creatures. Clearly, Davis is the picture’s secret weapon because she infuses subtlety in a screenplay that lacks such a critical element.

I found it strange that the filmmakers are afraid to show the creatures without the need to employ quick cuts and extreme closeups. From the glimpses presented, the special and visual effects team, as well as the makeup artists, do a solid job in creating spooky, menacing villains. The lack of willingness to keep the camera still when the monsters make an appearance communicate an absence of confidence in the images. In horror movies like this film, the creature begs to be seen. After all, numerous scenes are shown using the child’s perspective. It doesn’t make sense that we do not see what she sees; what terrifies her should also terrify us.

There is an angle worth pursuing but the writers neglect to provide enough dimension to the characters involved since they are too busy embracing clichés. From time to time, Charlie (Antonia Thomas) and James (Luke Norris), young parents of a six-year-old, are shown as being completely exhausted from having to take care of a child with special needs. Aside from the first few scenes, once Thea is born we no longer see them living a life of their own, together as a couple or apart. Focus is on one confronting occurrence after another. Charlie talks about abandoning her child so she can have her life back. While an interesting admission, the material brings it up and just as quickly pushes the revelation under the rug as if it never happened.

Directed by Nirpal Bhogal, “FirstBorn” is wildly uneven but most egregious is a lack of resolution. It just ends—invoking a feeling that it had run out of ideas. Obviously inspired by classic horror-thrillers involving children potentially being possessed or are evil attempting to possess children, the filmmakers needed to have looked further into what made those pictures work in terms of their mythologies as opposed to providing cheap, easy, forgettable jolts. Here is a work with some good ideas but one that limits its own potential.

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