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Posts tagged ‘alice eve’

5
Sep

Before We Go


Before We Go (2014)
★★ / ★★★★

“Before We Go,” directed by Chris Evans, takes inspiration from Richard Linklater’s “Before Sunrise” in which two people meet and by the end of their limited time together, they realize that perhaps there is something between them worth exploring further. Although the film has an identity of its own, the romantic elements do not come together in such a way that leaves us enraptured and wanting more.

Perhaps it is due to the dialogue. At times Nick (Chris Evans) and Brooke (Alice Eve) share some amusing and touching exchanges, but platitudes are inevitably come up—especially when they offer each other advice. The experience is like listening to really nice song but a split-second or two the player skips and it is just enough to ruin the moment. Credit to Evans and Eve for trying their best to work with a script that occasionally comes across as false. These two have a lot of natural charm—together and apart—and it makes up for moments that ought to have been reshot or eliminated altogether.

Shooting onsite in Manhattan elevates the picture. During its slower moments, it is worth taking a look at the background: the kinds of people out on the streets late at night, how they walk, what they are wearing, the multicolored lights dancing in the city. The urban milieu is quite beautiful because it is taken as is. We could almost smell the stench of the garbage and sewers as the characters walk through rougher neighborhoods.

The characters express plenty of inner turmoil, but it feels like something is missing. Maybe it is because they talk about their past and regrets so often that it does not give enough time for them—and us—to appreciate the present. Part of the reason why this film’s inspiration is so successful as a character study is because Linklater makes a point of focusing on the present. Céline and Jesse do talk about their pasts but we get a strong sense that they are not defined by them. Here, Brooke and Nick are superglued to what has happened (or has not happened) to them that their conversations feel like a pity party at times.

The film, written by Ronald Bass, Jen Smolka, Chris Shafer and Paul Vicknair, offers a few standout scenes. The performance on stage with Nick playing the trumpet and Brooke singing “My Funny Valentine” dares the viewer not to put on a smile. Another highlight involves a psychic (John Cullum) with wisdom to impart. But three or four well-executed scenes are not enough to make the movie a completely romantic experience. The dialogue, the environment, the themes, and the performances must dance together and share the same rhythm.

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3
Mar

ATM


ATM (2012)
★ / ★★★★

After a Christmas party, three co-workers decide to carpool home. Corey (Josh Peck) needs cash so David (Brian Geraghty) pulls his car over at the nearest ATM, this one an enclosed space, surrounded by glass, with only one door that requires a bank card to open. Noticing that Corey is taking too long, David checks up on his friend to see what is wrong. Emily (Alice Eve), scared of staying in the car by herself, follows the two guys. It turns out that Corey’s card is not working. Just when they are about to leave, a man wearing a parka (Mike O’Brian) stands from a couple feet away, just observing them. Unsure of the man’s intentions, the three choose to stay inside which quickly proves to be a correct decision as the man kills a potential witness right in front of them.

Based on the screenplay by Chris Sparling, given that “ATM” seems intent in playing the “What would you do in this scenario?” game, which can be fun in theory, it backfires because the characters are not very smart. They work in finance so one might think they have a certain level of logic or are capable of thinking outside the box when the situation calls for it. It is most frustrating that the more obvious courses of action are saved much later on when they neither have the energy nor the focus required to come out on top.

I wondered why the screenplay consistently fails to provide the trio more chances to fight back and challenging itself to come up with more twists and turns instead of relying on the characters standing around, arguing, and attempting to break one of the machines in hopes that the proper authorities will be alerted. Watching figures on screen panic is boring unless they are believable and the script has found a way to make them relatable. If the images are more about behavior rather than the experience, the film fails to work as a thriller.

The characters are not devoid of personality but are nonetheless unexciting. Corey is the one who constantly speaks out of turn and whose sarcastic remarks convey a transparent self-loathing. David, a well-meaning and quiet guy, does not feel like his job is rewarding on a personal level. Meanwhile, Emily is David’s object of affection and is looking forward to leaving the company in a few weeks.

I could not help but wonder if they would have shared more chemistry and had been more believable if older actors were casted. While all three are easy on the eyes, they possess neither the angst nor a semblance of experience of being consumed in a cutthroat profession.

On the bright side, there are some nifty things performed by the killer to coax his victims out of the building. For example, I was amused by the fact that he actually brings a fold-up chair so he can sit and watch how the trio might try to get out of… difficult situations. We have to wonder: there has to be a reason why this man is enjoying his victims’ suffering. However, the final scenes suggest otherwise which do not match the images we had sat through. In a way, by using a negative twist, the film, directed by David Brooks, circumvents explanations that we are entitled to receive.

6
Apr

She’s Out of My League


She’s Out of My League (2009)
★★ / ★★★★

I just realized that the more I watch Jay Baruchel, the more I like him. There’s something very geek-chic about him that’s just adorable–I don’t know if it’s the voice or the awkward body language but he manages to pull it off with such ease. In “She’s Out of My League,” directed by Jim Field Smith, he plays an airport security agent with dreams of becoming a pilot who one day meets a really good-looking girl (Alice Eve). After some coincidences and strange (but amusing) circumstances, she ends up asking him out on a date, leaving the lead character’s friends (T.J. Miller, Mike Vogel, Nate Torrence) shocked and confused. I enjoyed watching this movie as a whole but I think it could have been edgier and it could have used more focus in terms of the odd couple’s romance. I think the movie spent too much of its time with the highly obnoxious family (I think if I met them I would run the other way) and in a way, I saw it as an excuse to deliver the gags so it wouldn’t have to tackle the deeper psychology of an insecure man as often as it should have been. And although I did think that the main character’s friends were funny, they couldn’t just accept the fact that their geeky friend was going out with a gorgeous woman. Their sometimes lack of support irked me and it made me question whether they were really good friends. Perhaps the picture was trying to show the friends’ own insecurities through denial but it would have been nice if they didn’t make fun of the lead character as much. The bit with the ex-boyfriend (Geoff Stults) was also another distracting element that didn’t need to be there. Nevertheless, as a romantic comedy, I think the picture worked; it may have been pretty standard most of the time but there were nice moments when I felt like Baruchel and Eve had a good connection. I think the film was at its best when the two characters were just engaging in conversation about their dreams and failures with all jokes aside. We’ve all seen couples that make us think, “What the heck does she see in him?” This movie was essentially that little (sometimes nagging) thought in our heads. The lessons might have been obvious (beauty on the inside matters) but it’s nice to be reminded of it because there’s a universal truth to that lesson. “She’s Out of My League” has both laugh-out-loud and cringe-worthy moments (mostly with that annoying family) but I think it’s worth watching for its own merits.