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Posts tagged ‘chick flick’

21
Aug

Confessions of a Shopaholic


Confessions of a Shopaholic (2009)
★★★ / ★★★★

You know, I’ve got to say that twenty minutes into this movie, I thought it was going to be just another shallow chick flick about a woman, played by Isla Fisher (“Definitely, Maybe,” “The Lookout,” “Wedding Crashers”), who liked to shop for expensive clothes and eventually fell in love with a guy who speaks with a European accent, played by the very charming Hugh Dancy (“Beyond the Gates,” “Ella Enchanted”). Yes, that was the basic premise. But then the last forty minutes of the picture arrived and it convinced me that it wanted to be something more. And it succeeded on multiple levels. When all of the main character’s lies and credit card bills finally caught up with her, there was an inherent sadness about her whole predicament. I was convinced that she genuinely did want to change, but like an addict, she kept going back to her old ways despite the advice from her family and friends. I’ve read some critiques that the tone of this film was uneven. Strangely enough, that’s what I liked about it. The first part was more comical and blasé because it intended to establish a character who was very energetic and had a real passion for fashion. The second part was more about her insecurities, conflict with her inner demons (and bill collector played hilariously by Robert Stanton–that elevator scene was absolutely brilliant), crumbling relationships with the people who are most important to her, and the things that she had to do (no matter how much it pained her) to stop drowning in debt. Directed by P.J. Morgan (2003’s “Peter Pan” and “My Best Friend’s Wedding”–another film that was surprisingly effective), “Confessions of a Shopaholic” has a little bit of edge just below that pink, glittery surface. I also liked the fact that the romance between Fisher and Dancy was always secondary. Their scenes were a nice break from the money issues and I could not help but laugh during their dancing scene. Though they did have some chemistry, I’m glad that Harvey chose to focus more on the lead’s addiction. I also very much enjoyed the supporting characters such as Krysten Ritter, Joan Cusack and John Goodman as Fisher’s best friend, mother and father, respectively. If the film had less slapstick and a stronger core, this probably would have had a pretty powerful punch considering that most Americans are now wary of the things they buy due to the failing economy.

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22
Jul

The Ugly Truth


Ugly Truth, The (2009)
★★ / ★★★★

It’s weird because as I was watching this movie, I found myself laughing because the characters, especially Katherine Heigl’s, were eccentric in their own ways. But after a few hours after I saw it, I felt as though the characters were more like caricatures and now I’m unsure whether to give it a recommendation. Heigl stars as a television producer of a news show who had to endure of the presence of Gerard Butler because they were on the verge of being cancelled due to their falling ratings. People liked to hear Butler’s blunt opinions so Heigl’s superiors decided he could help the news show from being cancelled and save their careers. The two leads could not be any more different. Heigl doesn’t like to let her hair down, has a checklist on what she looks for a guy, and lives with her cat. Butler thinks women are deluded because they don’t see men for what they really are: pigs who only care about looks, sex, and what feels good. Predictably enough, they fall for each other because Americans have this (ridiculous) view of opposites always ending up together. Tension between them rise when Eric Winter enters the picture as Heigl’s hunky doctor of a neighbor. I think the film was at its best when Heigl and Butler were constantly butting heads and eventually teaming up so that Heigl will have a chance on going out with her neighbor. It touched upon certain real relationship issues such as who’s really in charge of their own orgasms, whether fake orgasms is better than no orgasms (though I think the film gave bad advice on this one), the sacrifices one is willing to make in order to reach a common ground, and how power and manipulation affects relationships. But who wants to think about those things when two girls are wrestling in jello on screen? Ultimately, I think this picture is its own worst enemy. At times, I found a number of contradictions from its initial arguments and it eventually became another forgettable chick flick. And toward the end, I felt as though it lost a lot of its steam and was no longer interested on how it would turn out. Nevertheless, if one is interested in watching something funny, this one is a pretty good choice. It will not enlighten but it will most likely entertain.