Tag: corey feldman

Gremlins


Gremlins (1984)
★ / ★★★★

The horror-comedy “Gremlins,” written by Joe Dante and directed by Chris Columbus, is an excellent example of a movie so reliant on special and visual effects that substantive portions of the story are ignored altogether. It is a shame because it starts off with a curious premise: a teenager (Billy played by Zach Galligan) is given a mogwai by his inventor father (Hoyt Axton) as an early Christmas present. But, according to the Chinese shop owner where the cute, furry creature came from, three rules must be followed: do not expose it to bright light (especially sunlight), do not expose it to water, and do not feed it after midnight. Naturally, the rules must be broken so we see what happens next. Still, must it be so boring?

The movie is rated PG and so it is expected that children be exposed to this drivel and find it entertaining somehow. I find it insulting that the material belittles how smart children can be. I think intelligent kids would find it repetitive and preposterous because the filmmakers fail to offer a consistent sense of wonder. There is no central idea or concept that ties the movie together.

Sure, the mogwai is adorable with its big eyes, floppy ears, and how it is able to utter short phrases but… what else? After about thirty minutes of capturing our attention, the screenplay proves it has nothing of value to show or say. There are bits and pieces of characters making remarks regarding foreign items, tools, or appliances being inferior compared to American. What else is foreign? The mogwai. But this angle—which could have been interesting—lacks supporting details.

Speaking of lacking, there is a sweet, potential romantic connection between Billy and Kate (Phoebe Cates). Galligan and Cates share such solid and believable chemistry, their characters can sit together at a table and say nothing yet they would still be adorable. So, why aren’t these two allowed to speak like actual teenagers who, by golly gee, may actually want to get to know one another a little better? Notice how their scenes almost always feel rushed. As it were a chore to have two humans share a whiff of intimate dialogue. Maybe it is easier to show puppets causing trouble (and murder) around town. Its priorities disgusted me.

It isn’t like the mogwai in its final form looks that impressive. It looks cheap—the angry eyes, green skin, sharp teeth—and it moves like a robot. We’re supposed to laugh, I guess, that the mogwai (which have multiplied at an alarming rate), have watched television and so they try to emulate what they’ve seen like hanging out in bars, smoking, getting drunk, gambling, and the like. And when it goes for the horror (read: lame jump scares), there is no sense of craft or suspense. It is all about delivering something ostentatious like someone getting stabbed, or bitten, or being thrown out of a window. These violent scenes are not even remotely darkly comic because to do so requires cleverness. And the movie is supposed to entertain children?

As I sunk into my chair racking my brain as to how “Gremlins” became a “classic,” I realized how nostalgia is a hell of a drug. This movie is awful because it is simply a parade of midget scaly monsters causing chaos in a small town—comparable to a generic episode of “Goosebumps” which is actually more merciful because each episode is only about twenty minutes. This movie is nearly two hours. (It feels longer.) There is no story worth telling here, just filmmakers who needed to make money. It is clear their hearts weren’t in it. And if the movie could be destroyed by sunlight, I say expose every copy because it is junk and deserves to be forgotten.

Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter


Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984)
★★★ / ★★★★

There is no typical final girl in the third sequel of the “Friday the 13th” franchise, “The Final Chapter.” Based on the screenplay by Barney Cohen, it is the most inspired one of the lot thus far, surpassing even the original in my eyes, because it is able to recognize patterns (read: cliché) that plagued its predecessors and manages to add some nifty twists to them. Much darker in tone and atmosphere than “Friday the 13th Part III,” which had potential because, like this film, it attempted to break away from the formula of the plot focusing on camp counselors gathering in or around Camp Crystal Lake, home of Jason Voorhees (Ted White), all to be slaughtered by the end of the movie—except for one.

This time, the story picks up right from the bloody aftermath of “Part III.” Jason is supposedly dead, but he springs to life while at the hospital, killing a nurse and a coroner. We get back to Crystal Lake… but the interest lies not in the group of teenagers who move to a cabin for the weekend. Instead, we meet Tommy and Trish Jarvis (Corey Feldman, Kimberly Beck), as well as their mother who loves to jog (Joan Freeman), a family still recovering from a divorce. (We also meet the dog Gordon.) Remove this family completely from the picture and it is interesting that what remains is a reproduction of the first two films. Perhaps that is the point: To tie up the first four moves in such a way that there is at least a semblance of cohesion.

As expected, we get the usual slicing and dicing, sharp objects piercing through the abdomen, post-coital blood spattering. There is even a creative use of a corkscrew. Half of the teenagers are standouts, for better or worse. Most memorable is Crispin Glover as Jimmy/“Jimbo,” the socially awkward one who is a bit sad for being turned down by a girl right before their trip. His dance moves must be seen to be believed. Another memorable actor is Lawrence Monoson who plays Ted the clown. I found him to be especially annoying because, unlike Shelly (also a clown) from “Part III,” Ted is not given any interesting dimension. With Shelly, he is written to be a lonely clown—it is clear he just wanted a friend. Ted, on the other hand, is just obnoxious. At one point I wished for Jason to appear when Ted was alone in a dark room just so there wouldn’t be any more scenes of him that I’d have to endure.

What elevates this slasher film is not the kills but the approach. We get the usual in-your-face violence. But there also times when we simply see shadows of Jason impaling his victim while out in the rain. Occasionally scenes end abruptly as the victim is in the process of dying—as if to communicate that the point has been delivered and so it is time to move on to next rising action culminating in another brutal killing. The fact that it doesn’t linger communicates a certain confidence, that it has a lot more to show. “The Final Chapter” is the most fast-paced installment so far. I think it is because the filmmakers are excited to show their ideas.

Make-up artist Tom Savini is back for “The Final Chapter,” and it shows. There is beauty to the broken limbs, deep cuts, and open wounds gushing blood. I wanted to study certain frames just a bit longer. But I think I enjoyed it most because director Joseph Zito is actually interested in showing deeper characterization compared to the other pictures. We observe Trish’s maturity as the elder sister; Tommy takes us up to his room to show off his hobby: making monster masks and props. And so when it is time for them to face the seemingly unstoppable Jason, we wish for them to get away not for the sake of having survivors but because we want their stories, their lives, to go on. “The Final Chapter” is a step in the right direction.

The Lost Boys


The Lost Boys (1987)
★★ / ★★★★

A mother (Dianne Wiest) moves from Arizona to California with her two sons, Michael (Jason Patric) and Sam (Corey Haim), in tow. Santa Carla, located right next to the beach, is fun and summery on the outside but upon closer inspection, its bulletin boards are full of flyers which advertise missing persons. While watching a band’s performance, Michael’s eyes become transfixed on Star (Jami Gertz), a girl involved with a biker gang led by David (Kiefer Sutherland). Later, Michael is suspiciously invited by the bikers to hang out in a chamber down by the beach. The gang turns out to be a group of vampires and David wishes to turn Michael into one of them.

“The Lost Boys,” based on the screenplay by Janice Fischer, James Jeremias, and Jeffrey Boam, offers somewhat engaging sequences when vampires feel the need to terrorize the living, but a plethora of questions, most being obvious, are ignored for the majority of its running time or left unanswered altogether. The picture has elements of fantasy and so it is all the more important that certain aspects of the story remain rooted in reality.

The vampires tend to pluck their victims from above, like pterodactyls, the camera serving as the creature of the night’s point of view. Each attack is unsettling despite not having a drop of blood being spilled. The audience are not even allowed to see what happens to the bodies after they have been taken. A lot is left to our imagination. Eventually, though, the picture must focus on the new family that has moved to Santa Carla.

What makes them special enough to kill the vampires that have been making the small town miserable for years? Further, while Sam and Michael have one or two convincing and funny brotherly scenes, there is no depth in their relationship. They are supposed to be kids who are products of divorce. How does the separation change or affect them other than being concerned that Grandpa (Barnard Hughes) does not have a TV?

Soon enough, Sam meets the Frog brothers, Edgar (Corey Feldman) and Alan (Jamison Newlander), at a comic book store. They seem to know an awful lot about vampires. Why had they not attempted to get rid of the town’s evil before? Are they simply waiting for a third member because the number three feels right?

Eventually, someone close to Sam is sired. While certain rules are established involving being a so-called half-vampire versus a “full” vampire, what are the adverse effects of half-vampires not feeding? And why is being a “full” vampire so important? From my observations, it is better to remain a half-vampire. For example, while both seem to be equally powerful, being a full vampire means not being able to walk in the sun. Seemingly simple details as such need to be sorted out in order to really get us to buy into its universe. Rules are equally important as exceptions. There are instances when exceptions tend to present far more interesting scenarios.

The final showdown is frustrating, convenient, predictable, and at times nonsensical. A character knowing when exactly to drive a vehicle into the house when he had been outside hours before the confrontation takes discerning viewers out of the picture. Moreover, when a vampire is killed, blood comes out of sinks and toilets for no reason. What does that have to do with anything? It is overkill. Is it not enough for us to see vampires dissolve into primordial goop? When the special effects run rampant, something that is supposed to be scary just comes across as silly (though not necessarily funny).

Directed by Joel Schumacher, “The Lost Boys” has a lot of ideas but it does not mean fitting them all in one film is right. If it had been more selective of ideas that worked, it may have turned out to be more than a product of ‘80s nostalgia.

The Goonies


The Goonies (1985)
★★ / ★★★★

In Richard Donner’s “The Goonies,” a group of kids found a map containing the location of a pirate treasure. Brothers Mikey (Sean Astin) and Brand (Josh Brolin) had a week before their family were forced to move because their parents could no longer afford their home. But when Data (Jonathan Ke Quan), Mouth (Corey Feldman) and Chunk (Jeff Cohen) agreed with Mikey to search for the mythical treasure for one last adventure, they stumbled upon the hiding place of three Italian criminals (Anne Ramsey, Joe Pantoliano, Robert David) on the run from the cops. Their hiding place contained a secret passageway that led to an underground cave that housed the legendary pirate ship. “The Goonies” would appeal to kids because they would most likely be able relate to the characters’ silliness and quirkiness, the soundtrack was energetic, and it played upon the universal idea of children’s penchant for treasure hunting. Despite being a kid at heart, I wasn’t that entertained. There were far too many people in the cave. The two girls, Andy (Kerri Green) and Stef (Martha Plimpton), were completely unnecessary. The romance between Andy and Brand dragged the picture’s momentum. How could we root for their romance if they weren’t fully realized characters? The fact that the picture kept suggesting that there could be something between Andy, around sixteen years old, and Mikey, who was still in elementary school, was more awkward than funny, creepy than cute. I felt like the girls in the movie were added simply to appeal to the same sex. I wish they made their exit when they stumbled upon a well where three guys above could have taken them home. I grew tired of their whining. I enjoyed the film most when the guys accidentally triggered booby traps. It was like watching a light version of Steven Spielberg’s “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” exciting but we never truly felt that the characters were in any real danger. We were simply curious to see how the protagonists would adapt to the quickly changing environment. I did wish, however, that the criminals were more dangerous. Most of the time, they acted more like cartoon characters. I didn’t buy for one second that they were smart enough to pull off breaking someone out of jail as they did in the first scene. “The Goonies” wasn’t rich with subtlety. The child actors’ lines often felt forced and it was obvious when some of their lines were dubbed. They probably ran out of takes. Still, the movie was entertaining and charming in its own way. Based on Spielberg’s story, I couldn’t help but wonder how sharper and stronger it might have been under his direction.