Tag: honesty

Paper Heart


Paper Heart (2009)
★★★ / ★★★★

This mockumentary chronicles Charlyne Yi’s quest to find love. Just when Yi was convinced that she would never feel the passion of romance because there was something innately wrong with her, she met Michael Cera and sparks immediately flew. But it wasn’t all fun and games because the presence of the cameraman and director (Nicholas Jasenovec) eventually put a strain on their relationship. I don’t understand why I lot of people hated this movie. I thought it was funny, honest and cute even though the scenes that involved the paper dolls were a little corny. What I love most about this picture was not the relationship between Cera and Yi. It was the many different types of people she interviewed from all kinds of race, gender, sexuality, age and the stories and point of views they had to offer. There was something genuinely honest about this film and that’s why it won me over even though it did have its flaws. Unlike most romantic comedies out there, this movie didn’t have dramatic arcs. It simply constituted a series of scenes that eventually forced Yi to look inside herself and realize that her not finding or not feeling romantic love has got nothing to do with emotional or chemical defectiveness. There’s a good message embedded in this film for those on the same page as Yi. That is, if you actively look for love every minute of the day, it’s never going to come. But if you just open yourself up to the value of experience, sooner or later, without even realizing it, it just might happen. As a person who doesn’t really care about being in relationships or finding “the one,” I can honestly say that I thought this movie was not going to be entertaining. I was so wrong; I actually saw Yi from under a different light. She’s not just an annoying girl who thinks she’s a comedienne who happens to make YouTube videos. There was a simplicity about her reflected in her reckless abandon. The awkwardness between her and Cera, especially the scene in the diner, was very amusing and relatable. Admittedly, I thought the last fifteen minutes of the movie could have been a lot stronger but the rest of it was strong and it made me feel warm. It’s been a while since I smiled so much while watching a movie.

The Sting


The Sting (1973)
★★★★ / ★★★★

I’ve heard a lot of great things about this film back when I was not yet in love with the cinema but never actually tried to search for it. I recently got around to watching this picture because I was in the mood for a classic story about American con men. What I loved about “The Sting” is the partnership between Paul Newman and Robert Redford. Each of them brought something to the table that the other one lacked, so having them together on screen was a joy to watch. I’ve seen a few of Redford’s more modern movies but none of them comes close to his performance here. In the beginning of the film, I thought he looks like a man who’s just in it for the money (and maybe a little bit of revenge) but as the film unfolded, among the chicanery and greed, he surprised me. He played the character with such honesty and introspection to the point where I realized the real reason why he does the things he does. Even though he cons other people, he feels remorse and is aware that he’s just like anybody else: capable of loneliness and hoping for a break from it all. As for Newman, I haven’t seen him in a lot of movies but this convinced me that I should. Behind those bright blue eyes, I found a certain connection–a sort of power–that is hard to come by in modern cinema. I must also commend the director, George Roy Hill, for the excellent pacing and the way he told the story. Yes, the 1930’s look of the film is magnificient–from the shiny vintage cars, exquisite clothes, colorful buildings up to the certain dialects the characters used–but without that feeling of wide-eyed excitement, all of those elements would’ve gone to waste. I thought this picture had a nice balance between thrill and comedy. Even though it’s comedic 80% of the time, that 20% of darkness peeks at the audience from time to time and that’s when I really I got involved. I wish the movie explored that darkness a bit more because it reminded me of modern gangster films’ certain styles and attitude. On top of all that, “The Sting” has a handful of twists and double-crossing that I didn’t see coming. This is a must-see.