Tag: ideas

Humpday


Humpday (2009)
★★★★ / ★★★★

Two college friends reunite (Mark Duplass as Ben and Joshua Leonard as Andrew) after a couple of years of not seeing each other. Ben and Anna (Alycia Delmore) are planning to form a family and make their lives as stable as possible. Andrew just got back from exploring different countries and really taking in on what life has to offer. One night when Ben decided to attend a party with Andrew and his friends, they decided to shoot a video for a pornographic film festival. The catch is that they would record themselves having sex despite being heterosexuals. What I love most about this small film was its big ideas underneath the subtle philosophical questions. Instead of creating characters that are defined one way or the other like in most mainstream works, I thought that Lynn Shelter, the writer and director, was able to capture actual essences of people with layers and complexities. Each of them was able to talk about his or her dreams, ideas and disappointments like a friend trying to bond with you in an intimate setting. With its great ear for dialogue (annoying quirks and all), I also enjoyed the fact that this film was very open to different kinds of sexualities. Better yet, it was able to present the idea that the majority of us are not completely straight and not completely gay. The way it explored that gray area inbetween the two extremes was fantastic and refreshing because I often forget that unexplored terrain when I watch movies unless I’m aware that it’s an LGBT picture. But the movie was not just about sex. It’s the close friendship that the lead characters shared, how it was challenged from time to time, and whether it was strong enough to withstand awkward situations such as going to a hotel room and trying to film a video of them sharing each other’s bodies. This is one of the most honest, funny and sometimes touching independent films I’ve seen in a while. It may not have the glamour of having popular actors, the best technical things like lighting and camera angles but, at least for me, everything was done in an exemplary way because it was able to balance emotions and intelligence without having to sacrifice its credibility. A lot of summaries out there make this movie sound like an obvious comedy but it’s far more insightful than that.

The September Issue


The September Issue (2008)
★★★ / ★★★★

Anna Wintour, the extremely influential editor of Vogue magazine, stated it perfectly in the very first few minutes of this documentary: Most people are scared of fashion and that’s probably why they make fun of it. Personally, I don’t think fashion is a ridiculous subject at all because it covers every aspect of beauty–something that is very important to me–not just when it comes to the clothes but the attitude that comes with them. Directed by R.J. Cutler, he documented all the hardwork, the conflict, the stress and the funny moments of what it took to release the September issue of Vogue. Two people are at the forefront: Anna Wintour and Grace Coddington, the editor and the creative director, respectively. I love that the movie covers the history of the two so we get some sort of idea where they came from and what it took for them to be where they are now. Although Wintour and Coddington have very different personalities, both of them are aware with how brilliant the other person is. Instead of competing with each other, they constantly push each other to be more critical and to continue to redefine beauty. While Wintour is truly a very intimidating ice queen, she’s not a total diva like how fashion editors were presented in motion pictures. She has her more tender moments, especially when she spends time with her daughter. On the other hand, I found Coddington to be very admirable because she’s not afraid to push for what she wants to be included in the magazine even if Wintour says “No” to her ideas time and time again. She’s a romantic and she remains to be a sweet individual despite the harsh realities of the fashion industry. While the two giants do have their disagreements, they share one crucial bond: They are very passionate with what they do and they want the magazine to be at its best. I was so engaged with this movie because there were times when I agreed with Wintour and there were times when I agreed with Coddington. I found it fun to see which photos would make it to the magazines, which was really hard at the same time because the photographs were stunning. This documentary is obviously targeted for people who are interested in fashion. However, for those who could care less about fashion should see this as well because it will undoubtedly show them that fashion is not a joke (though sometimes it can be). Like other more traditional jobs, it requires a lot of long hours, heartbreaking rejections, stress due to everything not going according to plan, and best of all, a thick skin.