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Posts tagged ‘love story’

21
May

Waiting for Forever


Waiting for Forever (2010)
★ / ★★★★

Will Donner (Tom Sturridge) didn’t have a home. He wandered from place to place, often hitchhiking because he didn’t have a car, because he was set on following Emma Twist (Rachel Bilson), an actress and a childhood friend, like a love-sick puppy. People were often touched of his stories about how much he loved Emma and how he planned on marrying her. The fact was the two haven’t spoken to each other since they were kids. Written by Steve Adams and directed by James Keach, if I could describe “Waiting for Forever” in one word, it would be “misguided.” I wasn’t convinced that it was a love story even though it tried desperately to be one because the sentiments were heavily one-sided. Emma, like myself, was creeped out by Will because his rationalizations involving why they should be together felt completely detached from reality. The screenplay begged us to feel sorry for him instead of identifying with him. His parents died when he was little, his brother (Scott Mechlowicz) looked down on his nomadic lifestyle, and he always wore the same pajamas. I guess he didn’t have any other clothes. His excuse was the pajamas felt comfortable. I found it insulting that the majority of the women melted after hearing Will’s stories. I agreed with the men: Will needed some help, possibly a one-on-one session with a counselor or a psychiatrist. It was difficult to judge him this way because the filmmakers confused child-like and childish. An adult’s child-like quality tends to momentarily sprout from its hiding shell. It happens without a person being aware of it. An adult is childish when he jumps on chairs, tables, and counters just to be “cute.” Will was certainly the latter. Sturridge was partly to blame. He needed to tone down his character’s ticks so we could focus more on his personal struggles instead of how hyper he was or how well he could juggle. The only believable people on screen were Emma’s parents, Richard (Richard Jenkins) and Miranda (Blythe Danner). Richard had terminal illness and Miranda hid her sadness by overcompensating with happiness. There was dramatic weight in the way they interacted with each other. Some words were ugly, some looks were undeserved but I felt like there was history between them. There was a memorable scene in which Miranda finally exploded at the man she no longer thought was the man she married. The way the camera was so close to their aging bodies and the way the purging of emotions was handled, it felt like I was intruding in their very personal moment. I wished the movie had been about them. I liked the last line in the movie because the joke had a punchline. That and the painful experience of constantly wondering why the characters chose to do what they did was finally over.

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17
Mar

All the Real Girls


All the Real Girls (2003)
★★★ / ★★★★

This very earnest and honest love story between a virgin (Zooey Deschanel) and a womanizer (Paul Schneider) may have been difficult to swallow but it was rewarding. Written and directed by David Gordon Green, the style of storytelling of this film was at first distracting because it constantly made quick cuts from one scene to another. But as the picture went on, I realized it was effective because the characters had to quickly say what they wanted to say even if the words that came out of their mouths were not exactly the truth. The first scene was very cute so I was instantly hooked. The romance between Deschanel and Schneider reminded me of the chemistry of the lead characters in “Before Sunrise” and “Before Sunset.” That scene was funny, and best of all, it felt real–like a conversation that I might overhear while waiting at a bus stop. I also liked the supporting actors such as Shea Whigham as Deschane’s older brother who did not approve of the relationship and Patricia Clarkson as Schneider’s mother. Although Clarkson was not the focus on the movie, she made the most of the material she was given. That is, a mother who worked as a clown to provide his son and as a mother for was concerned and frustrated with where her son’s life was heading. She played her character with such grace because she balanced sadness and strength really well. Lastly, I enjoyed the picture’s autumnal feel and its use of symbolism. Its complexity might easily be overlooked because of its initial distracting style but once one really gets into its rhythm, it really is quite keen when it comes to what it means to fall in love and be loved. Just when I thought the picture was borderline turning into a syrupy romance, it changed gears and commented on the relief and pain that comes hand-in-hand with being honest with one’s self and wanting to change so bad to be accepted by someone. It also had a chance to tackle issues such as the breakdown of communication when distance is involved, the dynamics of friendship and what it means not only to love someone but also respect them. This is a smart sleeper film that doesn’t give us the easy and sugary answers we want to hear. But it is the kind of film that assures us that it’s alright to be confused and to question what and how we really feel toward someone important to us.

27
Dec

Good Dick


Good Dick (2008)
★★★ / ★★★★

Written, directed and starring Marianna Palka, “Good Dick” was about a woman (Palka) who often visited a video store to rent erotic movies and the charming man (Jason Ritter) who instantly fell in love with her. But this is far from a typical romantic comedy because Palka’s character had no interest in Ritter despite his many attempts to win her over. I loved the fact that this film turned the romantic comedy genre on its head and instead tried to tell a modern and more realistic take on budding relationships. I enjoyed that Ritter was the more whiny, idealistic and clingy (“feminine” qualities in most mainstream rom-coms) and Palka was more aggressive, cruel, and detached (“masculine” characteristics). The unnamed lead characters were both damaged in some way even though it might not seem like at first. Their flaws were often explored which was fascinating to watch because some scenes that I expected to be funny ended up being sad and the scenes that I expected to be more dramatic ended up being pretty hilarious. I wanted the characters to succeed and end up happy from the very beginning because they were essentially good people even though the chances that they’d up together was pretty bleak. After all, Palka’s character didn’t want to socialize, didn’t want to explore the area where she lived, and she said in a clear and precise way that just looking at a penis disgusts her to the very core. Even though I liked Palka’s dark and edgy character, there were moments when I thought she was a little too cruel to the guy that adored her, claiming that he’s ugly, that his job was pathetic and he really only wanted her for her money. That strong emotional barrier that she built around herself over the years of trauma was challenged by Ritter, but sometimes a step forward to finally putting that wall down was met by another two steps backward. If one was interested in a new and more honest take on relationships, one she should definitely seek this one out. Chances are not many people have heard about this picture because it is an independent film. “Good Dick” definitely took me by surprise because of how emotional it was. The last few minutes impressed me because certain characters stopped throwing a pity-party and finally claimed their freedom.