Tag: torture porn

Hostel: Part III


Hostel: Part III (2011)
★ / ★★★★

Scott (Brian Hallisay) was about to be married in a week so Carter (Kip Pardue), the best man, decided to take his friend to Las Vegas, Palm Springs being their cover from Amy (Kelly Thiebaud), for a bachelor’s party with Justin (John Hensley) and Mike (Skyler Stone). As the four gambled, Kendra (Sarah Habel) and Nikki (Zulay Henao) eyed Scott from a distance and later informed them that there was a party way out from The Strip. As the hours passed by, Mike was eventually nowhere to be found. “Hostel: Part III,” written by Michael D. Weiss and directed by Scott Spiegel, was promising because of its surprising first scene involving a scraggly guy in his twenties (Chris Coy) who mistakenly entered an Eastern European couple’s hotel room and was invited to have a drink. While its predecessors were set in Slovakia, it should be noted that this installment took place in Las Vegas. In its own way, on purpose or otherwise, it created a challenge for itself. Since Eli Roth’s “Hostel” and “Hostel: Part II” were set in a foreign country, it was almost easier to identify with the characters, despite their seemingly innate lack of common sense, because of their nationality. There was an underlying statement about the xenophobia found in all of us when we are in a different country and hear people speak in a foreign tongue. In this picture, the Americans became the tormenters, so the protagonists had to have something special in order for us to root for them. They did not. While each had his own distinct personality and temperament, we knew nothing about them other than their quirks and what they told one another. Hence, when the twists in the screenplay finally arrived, I felt little to no emotional impact while watching it. Although the scenes involving torture were still grizzly and bloody, one of them involving bugs, they failed to encourage a visceral response from me. Perhaps it had something to do with the style of shooting scenes and the way they were put together. Instead of having drawn-out sequences designed to increase our dread as the characters became more confused about the whereabouts of their friends, there was more than a handful of scenes interrupted by manic cutting and aerial shots of the city. Furthermore, there tended to be more people in one shot which took away some of the feelings of isolation we were supposed to experience with the characters. There was one change that I thought was somewhat interesting. Instead of simply having a room with just a victim and his tormenter, people were actually allowed to watch from behind the glass. The spectators’ chairs had buttons that they could press if they chose to bet, for example, how many arrows it took to kill a person. The concept worked because it made sense in terms of the film’s setting. If “Hostel: Part III” was able to take that level of creativity and had been more consistent with it, it would have been a passable addition to the franchise. It was hinted that Elite Hunting had more branches, one located in Asia. With all the missing people because of this sadistic group (who liked to hunt Americans) one would think that the FBI or the CIA were more informed.

A Serbian Film


A Serbian Film (2010)
★ / ★★★★

Milos (Srdjan Todorovic) was a former pornographic actor who retired early. He had some savings but since he didn’t have a stable job, his family was in a state of financial difficulty. When Lejla (Katarina Zutic), a former colleague, contacted Milos about a once in a lifetime opportunity work with an independent director, Vukmir (Sergej Trifunovic), the husband and his wife (Jelena Gavrilovic), Marija, agreed that he should accept the offer because the paycheck would allow them to be set for life. However, Vukmir’s project was incredibly top secret. Even Milos was ignorant to what he was about to do in front of the camera. Based on the screenplay by Aleksandar Radivojevic and Srdjan Spasojevic, “Srpski film” managed to take the term “torture porn” on a new level. There was a plethora of scenes that depicted women as playthings. It showed them screeching out of pain from objects thrusted inside them, being punched in the face until their faces were swollen and bloody, forcing to perform fellatio until they passed out due to a lack of oxygen, and being cut into pieces with a machete. It was ugly and it was shameless in challenging us to keep our eyes open to see what would happen next. Supposedly, the filmmakers’ intention was to parody the movies made in Serbia. They didn’t like the forced political correctness that plagued the films in their country. So, by creating something that is so far from what is expected, it is an act of standing up against the mundane movies that are constantly being financed, made, and released. I understand their intention, but I don’t quite see how this project is supposed to be a parody given that there was nothing amusing about it. I was disgusted. I was shocked. I was disturbed. But laugh I did not. I thought it was very cruel to women. For a movie that was supposed to be progressive-thinking, the final cut was backwards. And it fails with a deafening thud. Furthermore, if the filmmakers’ intentions were completely taken out of the equation, I would still consider the film to be weak. Milos wasn’t portrayed as a responsible father and husband, in the least, so how could we root for him? His family was supposed to be struggling financially, yet it wasn’t shown to us that he tried to get a job anywhere. It was mentioned that he had an education. He wasn’t old, so why didn’t he seriously consider other options before accepting a cryptic job? The movie was about a half an hour too long. There were too many scenes when Milos was drugged and looking confused. He, as well as the audiences, were left to decipher what had happened to him through millisecond flashes of images accompanied by shrill, harsh sounds. Not only were the techniques an assault to the senses, it didn’t feel like being on a journey with Milos was ultimately worth it. He lacked pragmatism; he always happened to helplessly stumble upon one bad situation to the next. “Srpski film,” also known as “A Serbian Film,” directed by Srdjan Spasojevic, is a one-note mean joke where nobody wins. I welcome transgressive movies given that their ambition and intention meet a certain level of artistry that forces me to think about the power of the movies as well as consider possibilities of unexplored territory. Pascal Laugier’s “Martyrs” is an excellent example of a transgressive film. “A Serbian Film” is cheap and execrable.

Borderland


Borderland (2007)
★ / ★★★★

Three friends (Brian Presley, Rider Strong, Jake Muxworthy) who were about to graduate from college decided to take a trip to Mexico so they could get laid and get stoned. While they were high on hallucinogens, one of them decided to visit a prostitute he met earlier that day. While wandering the dangerous streets of Mexico, Phil was abducted by a group of satanists looking for the perfect human sacrifice. Directed by Zev Berman, “Borderland” failed to determine the difference between disgust and horror. Based on a true story, I felt anger when it paid so much attention to the violence instead actually attempting to convince us why the story was worth telling. I didn’t need to see a man’s eyeballs being plucked in such a slow and gratuitous fashion. However, I was interested in the film’s anti-American undertones. The three Americans were portrayed as complete idiots. I found no reason for them to be friends. After all, what kind of people would allow their friend to walk in dark alleys by himself while intoxicated by ‘shrooms? Phil, son of a priest, was desperate to lose his virginity that he was willing to pay money for sex. He often gave into peer pressure from Henry, a deluded brat who believed that people were poor because they chose to be poor. And just when I thought Ed was the one worth rooting for, his set of ideals, though noble, was highly influenced by those around him. Instead of focusing more on the satanists that terrorized the community, much of the picture’s running time was dedicated to the trio acting like they’ve never been outside of their protected bubbles. They weren’t smart enough to recognize that the rules they’ve grown accustomed to live by no longer applied to their current and increasingly horrifying predicament. A cop named Ulises (Damián Alcázar), which I believe should have had more screen time, after a year since his partner was murdered by the satanists, became obsessed with finding out more about their practices. Ulises’ endgame was to expose them and find some sort of justice for those kidnapped, mutilated, and killed. If we saw the story through his eyes, the story would have been much more involving because he had access to resources that the three unsuspecting Americans lacked. Two of the three couldn’t even speak Spanish. At least one of them had to survive to tell the story but I found it ironic that they were almost irrelevant. “Borderland” borderlined exploitation. It had absolutely no intention in exploring the history, even very loosely, of the religious cult and their fixation for human sacrifice. It was generic torture porn that had the potential to become so much more.

Saw 3D


Saw 3D (2010)
★ / ★★★★

In “Saw 3D,” written by Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan, the supposed final installment of the commercially (although not artistically) successful “Saw” franchise had three strands. First, Jill Tuck (Betsy Russell), Jigsaw’s wife, was on the run from Detective Mark Hoffman (Costas Mandylor) so she took refuge at a police station. In return for protection, she was willing to divulge information about the infamous murders. Meanwhile, Detective Matt Gibson (Chad Donella) was in charge of solving a new crop of grizzly murders. Unlike the ones before him, would he be lucky enough to survive? Lastly, Bobby Dagen (Sean Patrick Flanery) claimed to have been been kidnapped by Jigsaw (Tobin Bell) and was successful at escaping his famous traps designed to teach a macabre lesson through painful irony. He and his entourage benefited from his fame based on untrue information. When he was kidnapped, was he capable of living up to his promise? “Saw 3D” was an excellent example why the series should simply end. I found no redeeming quality in it because every other scene was a flashback to the other six “Saw” pictures. Flashbacks are normally used to enlighten its audiences, not drive us into further confusion (and frustration). When I read reviews from fans of the franchise, they claim that they love the movies because “everything is connected.” No, it’s not. Just because a flashback makes a reference to a one minute scene from another movie, it does not necessarily mean there is a strong connection between the two. Aside from the first “Saw” movie, the rest lacked logic. Somewhere in the middle the central theme was lost. The victims were led to believe that they could get out of the traps. In reality, the possibility of escape was zero. How can we root for the character if we know she’s doomed? But I digress. “Saw 3D,” directed by Kevin Greutert, was plagued with clichés. From the cops’ arrival three seconds prior to the gruesome kill to a foggy night when something bad would eventually happen, it was one disappointing scene after another. The only comfort I found was to laugh at the ridiculous situations the characters found themselves in. I particularly enjoyed the scene of the woman, equipped with a shrill voice and in charge of public relations, who had a fish hook (along with a key necessary for her escape) stuck in her stomach and Bobby, using a string, had to pull it out of her mouth. It was bloody, flinch-inducing, grimly ironic, and fun to watch. Throughout the years, the franchise earned the label of “torture porn.” I thought it was appropriate. The acting was as bad as the ones seen in the very best pornographic films. I had to wonder where the casting directors found the actors. Maybe the actors knew the material was egregious but they just needed a big break. Who could blame them?

Saw VI


Saw VI (2009)
★★ / ★★★★

I just realized that a “Saw” sequel was released every year since the original. So it made me wonder when they would stop delivering us torture porn. Even though I do not particularly like the “Saw” franchise, I’m inclined to watch each movie that comes out because of my curiosity. In “Saw VI,” it was the same old formula: Jigsaw (Tobin Bell) gave his mindless and psychopathic minions (Costas Mandylor, Betsy Russell) cryptic envelopes from the grave that contained photos of people who “needed to learn how to appreciate life more.” I’ve never and will never agree with Jigsaw’s illogical rationalization of “teaching” people but it was brainless entertainment so I went along with it. I enjoyed saw “Saw VI” more than “Saw IV” and “Saw V” because it focused more on one individual (Peter Outerbridge) which was one of the leaders of an insurance company who devised a formula that decided whether the company would cover the cost of a person’s treatment for an illness. I also enjoyed (I’m not sure if that’s the right word) the opening scene which involved sacrificing the most amount of flesh for one to survive and the carousel scene. Other than those, the filmmakers threw the audiences random flashbacks designed to explain how “everything is connected.” For me, it’s all smokes and mirrors and I don’t see any brilliance in them. While most audiences would probably go, “Oh my god, that’s so smart!,” I just sit there and think, “That’s it?” because I could sometimes guess what the twist was (such as in this instance). While watching the movie, I actually thought of the possibility that one day, a writer would reset the franchise and make a hard-boiled procedural film (somewhere along the lines of “Zodiac” or perhaps even “Se7en”) about the Jigsaw murders instead of just featuring one torture scene after another. Instead of seeing the murder from a psychopath’s perspective (which we’ve been experiencing since “Saw II”), it would be nice to see it from a detective’s point of view. But not just any detective; a detective who is a good person even though he or she has her inner demons. A little bit of intelligence and heart would certainly benefit this franchise because so far, it hasn’t offered me anything new. But will that stop me from watching “Saw VII”? (Come on, I bet it was already in post-production by the time I saw this movie.) Probably not.

Saw V


Saw V (2008)
★ / ★★★★

I don’t know why I keep watching this series. Even though I have a feeling that it’s going to be disappointing, I still feel some sort of excitement whenever they release a sequel. I guess it has something to do with human nature and violence. Everything about this film is recycled. People claim that each sequel adds to the storyline because it provides information that the audiences did not have prior to a specific installment. I cannot disagree more. I think the writers have dug themselves so deep into the “mythology” of the series to the point where there’s five plotholes to each so-called twist. Each sequel then tries to solve those plotholes by trying to tell a story and providing more twists to keep the viewers engaged. It’s an interminable cycle that I think will not end any time soon as long as people are actually willing to pay for a ticket in the cinema. Even though I did enjoy this sequel more than “Saw IV” because it’s more comprehensible, we get too many flashbacks (it’s literally more than half of the film) that practically say, “Look over here! You missed this! Aren’t we brilliant and you’re not because you didn’t figure it out before?” It’s an insult but a laughable one so it becomes somewhat harmless. What worked for me was the rivalry between Costas Mandylor and Scott Patterson. I’ve been wanting these two to collide ever since the first few sequels. (I actually do not remember when each of the character appeared because all of them have the same “story.” Only the torture scenes are different.) Here, they get to battle it out a bit. Another actor that worked for me was Julie Benz even though I strongly believe that they could’ve used her more. She’s a strong actress (I’m still a big fan for her role in of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” “Angel,” and “Dexter”) and it shows in pretty much each scene she was in. What didn’t work for me was the return of Tobin Bell as Jigsaw. No, that is not a spoiler and you will see why. He talks in the same pitch and tone in pretty much every line and I can fall asleep listening to him. If they are going to make a “Saw VI” (which I bet they will), I want to see less of him. As for the infamous traps, I only have one favorite which has got to be the opening scene involving a pendulum. I also liked the part where Benz finally figured out what they were supposed to do right from the beginning. I cannot recommend this picture because everything is like a rerun of the first four movies.